Bidding Large Commercial Jobs | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Bidding Large Commercial Jobs

Timothyscarpet

Active Member
Aug 29, 2018
231
68
28
Real Name
Chris Westerman
Hey guys, I've got a very well established company in a somewhat rural area, mostly what I would consider higher end residential clients but I pretty much take any job as there isn't too much for competition in our area. I got an awakening the other day after I bid out a local hotel, all hallways and rooms carpet and tile and grout. I knew it was a large job and actually probably a little over my head but I put together some number anyways, bid way way lower than I would normally charge and sent it off. The manager emailed me back with some of the other bids they had gotten and I was still almost $2000 over!! I guess my question is to those of you guys getting large commercial accounts what is your strategy for bidding those. I have another bid in at a large mfg plant in town that is still being processed and now I am wondering if I need to re think my commercial bidding strategy. You don't know what you don't know I guess this will be a learning experience for me!
 

Dream Clean

Active Member
Oct 3, 2018
412
214
43
Real Name
Emerson Campbell
Don't shoot yourself in the foot. Bid according to what you need. My old boss can bid lower than me because he can send 3 trucks and 5 guys to a hotel and bang it out in a day. No real big change on his scheduling. I need to bid out higher because working by myself that job will take me 3-4 days with a lot of extra hours.

My pricing is pretty standard for all my commercial customers. Some think it's a great price. Some never call me back. If a customer is going to gripe about $500 for a filthy carpet in big store, I probably don't want them as a customer anyway. It's not always you. Some people just want cheaper work. And some companies work fast and cheap but may not be the same quality or customer service level you offer.

Bottom line I guess is charge what you know you're worth and don't lowball yourself just to get a job that will cost you more in the long run.