Better person | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Better person

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
35,962
18,312
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
My prior 5 year goal last have always been success driven, family, financially and business wise. One of my major goals from 2020 to 2025 it is to become a better person. Not saying I was “bad”. But now I have worked hard to change my thinking by meditation and trying to see more things from others perspectives.

Doing so has had several unintended results. One, I have felt bad for small mom and pop suppliers losing ground to big companies and maybe growing companies like myself. Second and even more profound is having employees that count on me to keep them busy through times like we are going through now with Coronavirus.

I feel I will survive pretty good, but those around me are taking a bad hit. Tough to think about them and their families going without. Where to draw the line is much more blurry now being more heartfelt. Used to be so easy, but now, not so much. Any thoughts?
 

OxiFreshGuy

Well-Known Member
Nov 12, 2016
2,110
1,493
113
Real Name
Boris Johnson
Business Location
United States
I'm a young whippersnapper Rob, but what I've noticed is successful people tend to trend a bit more selfish as the success is newer and become more generous once they see and empathize with those around them and acknowledge that not ALL of their success was simply due to hard work, smarts, and their own efforts.

The problem in my mind becomes, "Do I need that new $60,000 car this year" or perhaps do you set up a college fund for some well deserving employees? Are you doing enough to enrich their lives the way yours has been ?

It is when you tell yourself, "I built this empire, I deserve the fruits of my labor" it becomes dangerous thinking.

I think of Oskar Schindler who made his money as a war profiteer off the holocaust but then lost his fortune doing everything he could to protect his Jewish workers. He probably gained a far better treasure than money.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rob allen

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
35,962
18,312
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
I'm a young whippersnapper Rob, but what I've noticed is successful people tend to trend a bit more selfish as the success is newer and become more generous once they see and empathize with those around them and acknowledge that not ALL of their success was simply due to hard work, smarts, and their own efforts.

The problem in my mind becomes, "Do I need that new $60,000 car this year" or perhaps do you set up a college fund for some well deserving employees? Are you doing enough to enrich their lives the way yours has been ?

It is when you tell yourself, "I built this empire, I deserve the fruits of my labor" it becomes dangerous thinking.

I think of Oskar Schindler who made his money as a war profiteer off the holocaust but then lost his fortune doing everything he could to protect his Jewish workers. He probably gained a far better treasure than money.
Powerful. Thank you.
 

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
35,962
18,312
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
I don't understand the question
Let me rephrase it. At what point do you save the company vs saving others?
 

ACP

Well-Known Member
Apr 9, 2014
4,000
2,876
113
36
Washington
Real Name
Bjorn Marshall
Let me rephrase it. At what point do you save the company vs saving others?
If you don't save the company when this is over you won't have the ability to create jobs for people.

If your scrooge mc duck diving in swimming pools of cash and your faithful hardworking employees are starving that's a different story.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rob allen

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,781
4,202
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
Last week I went to the grocery store.

The shelves were torn apart; there was virtually nothing left that I'd come to get. Flour, beans, eggs, canned goods, rice, all gone... and the market case was empty. It was down to the oddball stuff that no one ever buys.

I managed to grab a few things with which to improvise a meal plan for the week, and I hadn't even reached half of my weekly budget. I had money to spend but no food on which to spend it.

While I was in the checkout lane, I notice that behind me was a lady who looked to be trying to shop for a family that included kids, and she was very frustrated. She kept looking over what was in her cart, muttering on occasion, and I could practically see the cogs in her head turning, trying to figure out how she was going to feed her family with this mishmash of weirdness she'd managed to grab.

It was obvious that she felt helpless, and having the same feelings myself I could relate.

But unlike her, I didn't have small children depending on me. We just have two adults, one of whom was already sick and not eating much, and a young man who had TWO sets of grownups watching out for him.

Suddenly I felt a helluva lot better about my own situation; it could be a lot worse. I felt grateful that I had a good job, a safe home, and someone to love; the stresses of not being able to find the kind of food I wanted right now at this moment seemed niggling by comparison. I have SO many things to appreciate, and I was letting myself get worked up over a lack of chicken boobs or coconut rice!

So when the cashier started ringing me up, I told her to add the groceries of the lady behind me. At first, the lady protested - until I told her "hey, it's rough right now and we need to look out for each other. I didn't spend anywhere near what I'd planned, so I've got extra and I want to help someone else. If you see someone having a bad day, just pay it forward."

She started to cry a little, and hugged me hard (which surprised me, honestly, but I'm not one to ever refuse a hug!).

She then proceeded to buy the groceries for the person behind her, who did the same for the people behind them. And so on, and so forth. Since none of us had a loaded cart, it wasn't as if anyone was spending a lot of money - it was more the feeling of giving, the gesture of goodwill, the concept that we were in a position to give to someone else, no matter how sparingly, and that told us we were all okay.

It reminded us all of what we HAVE, not what we LACK.

We stopped stressing and started smiling at each other.

When I left, the process was still going, and people were talking to each other instead of guarding their carts like hungry lions guarding antelope carcasses. Even the cashiers were grinning.

You don't need to do much to make a positive change in someone's life during times of crisis. Sometimes a small kindness helps someone to reset their viewpoint, and they stand up and breathe easier.

Taking care of others doesn't have to lessen your ability to help yourself; it doesn't have to be a grandiose gesture that saves a life. It can be something simple and downright tiny, and it starts a mental process in the other person that allows them to save themselves.

So you give as you can, where you can, and oddly enough you feel like you've gained more than you've lost when it's done - because when you're in a position to give AT ALL, it's a sign that you're okay.



From The Book of Joy, written by the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu:

“the three factors that seem to have the greatest influence on increasing our happiness are our ability to reframe our situation more positively, our ability to experience gratitude, and our choice to be kind and generous."
 

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,781
4,202
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
Amazing @Mama Fen simply amazing!
The amazing thing is, we ALL have the ability to go out there right now and do something tiny for someone else.

It's not about saving each other - it's about helping each other find the will and courage to save ourselves.

That, in my humblest of opinions, is one of things that makes us humane, not just human.
 

Johnny Bravo

Hacking my way though life, one room at a time.
Apr 25, 2011
24,046
8,562
113
San Pedro, Ca
TheJohnnyOnTheSpot.Com
Real Name
John Sheridan
Business Location
United States
Last week I went to the grocery store.

The shelves were torn apart; there was virtually nothing left that I'd come to get. Flour, beans, eggs, canned goods, rice, all gone... and the market case was empty. It was down to the oddball stuff that no one ever buys.

I managed to grab a few things with which to improvise a meal plan for the week, and I hadn't even reached half of my weekly budget. I had money to spend but no food on which to spend it.

While I was in the checkout lane, I notice that behind me was a lady who looked to be trying to shop for a family that included kids, and she was very frustrated. She kept looking over what was in her cart, muttering on occasion, and I could practically see the cogs in her head turning, trying to figure out how she was going to feed her family with this mishmash of weirdness she'd managed to grab.

It was obvious that she felt helpless, and having the same feelings myself I could relate.

But unlike her, I didn't have small children depending on me. We just have two adults, one of whom was already sick and not eating much, and a young man who had TWO sets of grownups watching out for him.

Suddenly I felt a helluva lot better about my own situation; it could be a lot worse. I felt grateful that I had a good job, a safe home, and someone to love; the stresses of not being able to find the kind of food I wanted right now at this moment seemed niggling by comparison. I have SO many things to appreciate, and I was letting myself get worked up over a lack of chicken boobs or coconut rice!

So when the cashier started ringing me up, I told her to add the groceries of the lady behind me. At first, the lady protested - until I told her "hey, it's rough right now and we need to look out for each other. I didn't spend anywhere near what I'd planned, so I've got extra and I want to help someone else. If you see someone having a bad day, just pay it forward."

She started to cry a little, and hugged me hard (which surprised me, honestly, but I'm not one to ever refuse a hug!).

She then proceeded to buy the groceries for the person behind her, who did the same for the people behind them. And so on, and so forth. Since none of us had a loaded cart, it wasn't as if anyone was spending a lot of money - it was more the feeling of giving, the gesture of goodwill, the concept that we were in a position to give to someone else, no matter how sparingly, and that told us we were all okay.

It reminded us all of what we HAVE, not what we LACK.

We stopped stressing and started smiling at each other.

When I left, the process was still going, and people were talking to each other instead of guarding their carts like hungry lions guarding antelope carcasses. Even the cashiers were grinning.

You don't need to do much to make a positive change in someone's life during times of crisis. Sometimes a small kindness helps someone to reset their viewpoint, and they stand up and breathe easier.

Taking care of others doesn't have to lessen your ability to help yourself; it doesn't have to be a grandiose gesture that saves a life. It can be something simple and downright tiny, and it starts a mental process in the other person that allows them to save themselves.

So you give as you can, where you can, and oddly enough you feel like you've gained more than you've lost when it's done - because when you're in a position to give AT ALL, it's a sign that you're okay.



From The Book of Joy, written by the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu:

“the three factors that seem to have the greatest influence on increasing our happiness are our ability to reframe our situation more positively, our ability to experience gratitude, and our choice to be kind and generous."

Some just talk, others do. I've said it before and I'll say it again, you're a class act @Mama Fen .
 
  • Like
Reactions: LeeRoy

PistolPete

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2014
1,966
1,242
113
Real Name
Peter Dymond
You have built a money making machine.
Keep the machine functional but streamlined right now.

Empty your personal piggy bank and keep your employees as much as possible.
Once this blows over the way businesses took care of their people will be what is remembered.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rob allen

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
35,962
18,312
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
Adjustments.JPG
 

Kxp

Active Member
Nov 28, 2017
167
64
28
54
Real Name
Kenneth Pena
Rob I think as long as we have the lord in our life we are always going to be challenged to change for the better I defiantly thing some things may hurt just some carpet cleaners opinion
 
  • Like
Reactions: rob allen

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
35,962
18,312
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
We cannot live better than seeking to become better.-Socrates
 

floorclean

Well-Known Member
Mar 31, 2016
972
606
93
Real Name
Dale MacDonald
Getting ready for shit to be tossed my way on this one!

But seriously for years and year I’ve worked and starved and got by on little or nothing. I’d guess that somewhere between 15 and 20 years I made little to no money in business.
On the other hand I’ve watched my peers drive new cars buy 4 wheelers new boats and new houses. They went on expensive vacations and partied like there was no tomorrow and Wore the best of cloths. They got weekends off and spent every holiday with their family. Not to mention the 60” TVs. The list goes on.
And now here we are! These are the people now that are crying they can’t make their mortgage payments and rent. Do I feel sorry for the vast majority or them. Not in the least. With very few exceptions theses people never saved for a rainy day. So will I be buying anyone’s groceries probably not.
Sorry if I sound cold hearted but it’s when I was getting up at 3am to go strip yet another floor they were sleeping in a nice warm bed. To me there’s almost always a reason for the haves and have nots. And it’s not like I don’t give to the less fortunate. I’d be the first one to buy a homeless person food. But what what we’re talking about here is not less fortunate it’s stupid and self greed. If your unable to pay your rent and your driving a $65k truck to damn bad I have no empathy for you what’s so ever.
 

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
35,962
18,312
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
I used to want for a new pair of shoes till i met a man with no feet, kinda puts things in perspective @rob allen
My parents had 9 kids. We were extremely poor. Had no running fresh water, had a coal stove for heat and wore hand me down clothes and shoes. It damaged my feet some wearing undersized shoes but I’m still thankful we had at least one good meal a day. During school year we did get food stamps for lunch. Kids made fun of me so I got a paper route and cut grass. I think being bad off gave me a better perspective and a hell of a work ethic. So I agree, perspective is virtually everything.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SRD