Best external heater?

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Larry Cobb

Well-Known Member
Mar 25, 2007
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Dallas, TX
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Larry Cobb
#2
Frank;

It takes a lot of POWER to heat water with electric heat.

I like the Mytee heater with four 600 watt heaters with separate switches for each heating element.

You can turn on just the number . .

the circuit breaker will support.

Larry Cobb
Cobb Carpet Supply
 
Dec 21, 2011
193
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Raleigh NC
Real Name
rob vantiflin
Business Location
United States
#4
I had that mytee heater and it was just ok, couldn't really keep up with a 2 jet wand. Now if I were you, I would make some kind of mini propane powered heater. something small you could bring inside and it would work off those mini Coleman tanks.
 
Apr 11, 2011
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bye
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United States
#6
The limitations of 120 volts doesn't make for a great heater. That being said, if a heater delivers only a 20° rise in temperature, that's better than nothing. You have to deal with the cards dealt to you. Speaking as someone who has used no heat and heat, heat is always better when all things remain the same otherwise. What gives the best results? With cleaning think
Chemical
Heat
Agitation
Time

When I have to deal with problems, I find agitation my most effective tool. A small job, I scrub with a $7 deck brush from Home Depot by Quickie. When a larger area comes into play. I get my 13" Hawk machine out. Same as the 13" Sanitaire machine. You probably want a brush with a center glide. The only one I know of is made by Liberty. It is a good brush. http://libertybrush.com/rotary_brushes.php If you aren't really scrubbing, you need to. Heat is nice, but I get a LOT more mileage out of scrubbing.
 
Apr 11, 2011
327
45
28
Real Name
bye
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United States
#7
I had that mytee heater and it was just ok, couldn't really keep up with a 2 jet wand. Now if I were you, I would make some kind of mini propane powered heater. something small you could bring inside and it would work off those mini Coleman tanks.
Sure fire way to asphyxiate yourself. Keep propane outside. Do you know what they call someone who brings anything other than a 1 lbs propane bottle indoors? Crispy idiot. Don't do it. Something happens, I don't care if you have $100,000,000.00 liability insurance. They will not pay a penny because you were totally reckless. Home made propane powered device? Not UL listed. Only a total idiot would play with that. I know you don't want to get stopped by DOT. Drive a commercial vehicle and the DOT sees that as a target on your back. I know a cleaner who took a $5,000 bath for pulling the ground out of one of his electrical cords. Another stupid thing you DON'T do. Right up there with no MSDS book within reach.
 

Vito

Bravo Carpet and Tile Cleaning
Premium VIP
Aug 17, 2012
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Naples, Fl.
bravocarpetandtilecleaning.com
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Vito Trupiano
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United States
#9
and i talk to donald and he said it the same heater in the goliath it can be run dry without damage. it has 1/2" heat rods with buit in fins encased in stainless steel. ther rods never touch the water. big plus you don't have to prime the heater before you turn it on . can't hurt it. and it put out real good he said you should get a 30 deg. incress. not bad for a 20 amp heater.
 

Scott W

Preferred Vendor
Premium VIP
Feb 14, 2006
15,818
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West Jordan, UT
www.interlinksupply.com
#10
An electric heater will only deliver as much heat as the limitations of the electric power permit. The heat rise will depend upon how fast you are using the water. If you cycle the wand valve on and off frequently, the water has a chance to get hotter. For most cleaners, the heat rise will be between 18 F and 25 F for a 2000 watt heater. Here is a link to ours. http://interlinksupply.com/index.html?item_num=AX39

I like the feature on the Mytee heater that Larry mentioned. 4 separate switches allows you to draw more power - if it is there.

My preference for heat would be a propane cart. Do keep it outside. You will likely get as much water as you need at very close to boiling temp. Close to 90 F heat rise if you are using about 1 gallon per hour. Here is on with all the safety inspections. http://interlinksupply.com/index.html?item_num=AX41
 
Nov 9, 2018
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North Bergen
Real Name
Poul
#11
I understand that I was a little late for the party, but I have some interesting observations that I want to share.

I have a 40' X 40' X16' shop. I have used a wood stove for years. When I was building parade floats ( up to 10) a year I used about 8 chords of wood. Now that I have retired I use the wood stove to "recycle" the junk mail and the household paper that would go to the dump to get buried. I just installed a new heat pump in my house and am now installing the old electrical furnace in the shop.
I will be placing the furnace on a platform suspended from the wall so the "air box" on the bottom of the furnce will be at 7 feet above the floor & in one of the shop's corners. This will allow the air from the furnace to blow in 3 directions. It will also allow the furnace fan to circulate the heat from the wood stove if the junk mail gets to darned heavy by just using the "fan cycle" on the thermostat.
As I only want to take the -FROST out of the air, I do not think it will cost to much to operate. I only want the temp at about 60 deg. F. unless I am painting or some such thing.

As I just had knee surgery last week, all projects are on hold for one more week.
Then it is "look out shop and AS".

I will post some photos when I get it up and running.

I am using the old electric furnace over a propane fired furnace for 2 reasons.
1: I already have it
2: Propane cost is higher than electricity, for example, https://10carbest.com/best-garage-heaters I filled up my propane tank for the house hot water heater in July and it is costing me $75.00 per month for a total of 11 months total. And that is just for hot water. I am looking at a new electric hot water tank soon. When I built the house I wired & plumbed it for both electric and propane water heater, kitchen range, furnace. And a free standing stove for when the power is out , maybe 2 times a year.

My power bill , even when the shop was running was only $250.00 at the highest. Now only $130.00 and under. Summer months only $80.00 or so. And I have a 2500 gallon pond system that runs 24/365 and runs about 3,000 per hour through the filters. The pond's cost is $8.92 per month now.

Just some suggestions and one good video, that I hope will help. Good Luck

 

Bob Savage

Well-Known Member
Mar 6, 2007
1,788
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Dayton, OH
www.perfection-carpet.com
Real Name
Bob Savage
Business Location
United States
#12
I am heating my shop with 220V electric baseboard heaters (5 of them). The entire building (26' X 36' with 10' ceilings and a complete upstairs for storage) is so insulated that it stays toasty warm all winter long (below 0º a few times each winter). Styrofoam insulation on the foundation walls keep the cold out of the slab.

Tyvek wrap on building, Pella windows, 10" ceiling insulation, full pack wall insulation, visqueen vapor barrier, etc. Even in the heat (above 90º) of summer, the shop is cool inside all day long with the A/C on low.

Getting back to the inline heater, I have the SteamBrite 6000 watt Volcano that is over 10 years old. It works well (although it really sucks down the juice), but is no match for LP.

Also got a Coy pond (1200 gallons) with waterfall and a farm heater for the winter to keep a hole in the ice.
 
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