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Any Hope For This Laminate Floor? Suggestions...

longkenn

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The pictures are of a laminate floor. It had carpet tiles glued down and then ripped up. Some of the finish is missing and it has glue left from the carpet squares. Has anyone had any success at restoring or would it be easier and more cost effective to just rip it out and replace which is the route I am leaning toward recommending to the customer. It is just a little under 200 Sq. Ft. of laminate.

Any suggestions
 

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keep it clean

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Do you install? Or know anybody that installs so you can sell the job?
 

keep it clean

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I have a guy that I can refer him to that installs. Fore 200 sq. ft. I think I will just refer it to him. I don't see any saving this one.
Second pic looks pretty bad. Some warping going on. I agree small amount of footage. I love installing the stuff. Though can be pain time to time. But not much tools needed to do it. Maybe your guy will throw a referral your way on the next one.
 
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longkenn

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It has missing finish. My fear is that the man will spend a bunch of money on trying to make something look good and then not be pleased with the result and then have to spend money on replacing the flooring anyway. If the finish was all intact I would feel better about trying to rescue it.
 

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It has missing finish. My fear is that the man will spend a bunch of money on trying to make something look good and then not be pleased with the result and then have to spend money on replacing the flooring anyway. If the finish was all intact I would feel better about trying to rescue it.
first off. if it has finish on it, the finish does not belong to the planks. It was applied to it . remove it rinse it and finish it again with a premium finish. May not be worth it for you money wise but if replacing is not an option, may be a $1 a foot for bringing that baby back to life would be worth it.

If you do, let them know it's not Ok to finish it but since they already did it in the past, that is the only rout now. A black poly brush in your 175 will do trick so you don't have to use pads and damage it further.
don't over wet mist the striper and have your helper vacuum immediately. done
 
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jtsunbrite

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first off. if it has finish on it, the finish does not belong to the planks. It was applied to it . remove it rinse it and finish it again with a premium finish. May not be worth it for you money wise but if replacing is not an option, may be a $1 a foot for bringing that baby back to life would be worth it.

If you do, let them know it's not Ok to finish it but since they already did it in the past, that is the only rout now. A black poly brush in your 175 will do trick so you don't have to use pads and damage it further.
don't over wet mist the striper and have your helper vacuum immediately. done
I agree with pinosan,, scrub and recoat it,, don't use a pad ! and have your gecko or wand ready to rinse fast.
 

MikeGaure

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Some engineered wood or laminates can be sanded and stained. Use a urethane to finish

@crash1big

But like Nick said looked like there was some warping or lippage.

Don't want much moisture on that as most aren't waterproof or even water resistant. See bad swollen joints all the time
 
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longkenn

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Some engineered wood or laminates can be sanded and stained. Use a urethane to finish

@crash1big

But like Nick said looked like there was some warping or lippage.

Don't want much moisture on that as most aren't waterproof or even water resistant. See bad swollen joints all the time
There is some warping and lippage. It is in pretty rough shape. I think I am going to recommend replacement.
 
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Mike Krall

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Silly question, why did they go over it with another product or is that something they found underneath?
 

longkenn

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Silly question, why did they go over it with another product or is that something they found underneath?
Home of an elderly man. For fear of falling he covered the floor with carpet squares then when it came time to sell he ripped the carpet out. He said in hindsight he should have done something different.
 
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crash1big

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If that is engineered wood; you could screen it (maybe), but if it is laminate; it's done. Looks like the new guy put it in.:)
 
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Mama Fen

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The problem with laminate is, it's a thin picture of hardwood over a VERY absorbant MDF or other wood-particle substance. Which means if you get any moisture jammed down between the boards, the warping is permanent (MDF and other pseudo-woods don't go back to their original dimensions when dried). It also doesn't have the channels cut into the bottom of each piece to wick away moisture, and many actually have a felt backing attached that does just the opposite.

It can be cleaned, certainly, but the amount of agitation and water flow associated with stripping and refinishing makes it delicate work. You also have only a "picture" of hardwood, so screening isn't an option.

On such a small area, it's certainly worth trying a good heavy scrub and recoat, if for no other reason than the experience. If it turns out to not meet his needs, replacement means you won't be out too much.

(edited because I was giving suggestions on engineered, not laminate. COFFEE. NOW.)
 
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