A little help for an odor issue in MY basement | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

A little help for an odor issue in MY basement

Robert86

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90 year old basement, concrete walls and floor. Musty as all get out down there. Doesn't seem to be an issue of mold though I wouldn't be surprised if there was once a mold problem. The floor seems to be the primary culprit here. Old, unsealed concrete slab. I'm thinking it needs a good deep clean and to be sealed. Wondering how you folks might go about something like this. I've been looking at Fiberlocks Advanced Peroxide Cleaner. Thinking of painting a couple coats of Killz on the floor but I'm not sure how it would hold up as a floor coating on its own. Is there a better product? Maybe a penetrating sealer for this kind of thing?
 

Scott W

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I would suggest Fiberlock as a sealer for concrete floor and block walls.
FiberLock 6000 is a mold resistant coating. You can add tint to it as one would wiht paint to have colored walls. https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=1607-1589

There is also a version of Fiberlock that is seals out odors, but I think the mold resistant version might be better in this case.

I would also consider permanently installing a dehumidifier. Depending upon climate and soil conditions, basements are often musty because of too much moisture trying to come through the walls. Since it won't be moved frequently and tossed into the back of vans, it does not need to be as durable as something made for the restoration industry. You can find cheaper alternatives or get someone's older non-LGR dehu. They go for $300 or so now.

Mount it on the wall and drain to a sink if available or a very large bucket.
 

Robert86

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I would suggest Fiberlock as a sealer for concrete floor and block walls.
FiberLock 6000 is a mold resistant coating. You can add tint to it as one would wiht paint to have colored walls. https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=1607-1589

There is also a version of Fiberlock that is seals out odors, but I think the mold resistant version might be better in this case.

I would also consider permanently installing a dehumidifier. Depending upon climate and soil conditions, basements are often musty because of too much moisture trying to come through the walls. Since it won't be moved frequently and tossed into the back of vans, it does not need to be as durable as something made for the restoration industry. You can find cheaper alternatives or get someone's older non-LGR dehu. They go for $300 or so now.

Mount it on the wall and drain to a sink if available or a very large bucket.
Thanks for the feedback.

Generally pretty dry climate and a fair amount draft down there. I guess that's one advantage of an old home, plenty of air flow. But a dehumidifier's probably a good idea anyway. Unfortunately, there are no drains in the basement. Well, that's not entirely true, there is a drain in the den but it's under the CGD carpet so it's pretty useless. Bucket it is then!

That fiberlock coating sounds exactly like what I'm looking for, but for the area I'm looking at I wouldn't use 5 gallons. If they make it in gallons I think 2 would do it. I'll have to look around.
 

Frank House

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Would need more information to assist.

The climate zone you live in.

Have you used a moisture meter or hygrometer on the area?

Do you know what the relative humidity is in the area in question?

I would normally recommend to most people with basements a 70 pint dehumidifier.
A dehumidifier smaller might not be able to solve the moisture issues.
They sell dehumidifiers for residential use that have built in pumps. Make sure the dehumidifier you get has a humidity control setting on it.


If painting or sealing the surfaces, Make sure to prep it properly for best adhesion. Also make sure the surface doesn't have to much moisture. Typically running the drying equipment. Or dehu in this case to lower the moisture content prior to the application.

Hope this helps.
 
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Robert86

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Would need more information to assist.

The climate zone you live in.

Have you used a moisture meter or hygrometer on the area?

Do you know what the relative humidity is in the area in question?

I would normally recommend to most people with basements a 70 pint dehumidifier.
A dehumidifier smaller might not be able to solve the moisture issues.
They sell dehumidifiers for residential use that have built in pumps. Make sure the dehumidifier you get has a humidity control setting on it.


If painting or sealing the surfaces, Make sure to prep it properly for best adhesion. Also make sure the surface doesn't have to much moisture. Typically running the drying equipment. Or dehu in this case to lower the moisture content prior to the application.

Hope this helps.
I'm in NW Montana. After some heavy rain the other day the humidity hit 52% for a day. It's down to about 20% now. That's with just a box fan running down there. That air circulation seems to be helping a lot. I also have AC going but that's upstairs.
 

keep it clean

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Dehumidifier, make sure all rain spouts drain away from foundation. Make sure gutters are clear. Drylok your walls. Floors seal and paint. It will help some. But the dehumidifier with pump. It will do most of the work removing moisture from the air. Thats about as far as ide go into it. This is a rental you're in now isnt it? I might be thinking of someone else. I sometimes get members mixed up.
 

Robert86

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Dehumidifier, make sure all rain spouts drain away from foundation. Make sure gutters are clear. Drylok your walls. Floors seal and paint. It will help some. But the dehumidifier with pump. It will do most of the work removing moisture from the air. Thats about as far as ide go into it. This is a rental you're in now isnt it? I might be thinking of someone else. I sometimes get members mixed up.
Yes, I'm renting. It's a nice place and we're getting a good deal so I don't mind putting a little money into it for something like this.

We are working to get the gutters worked on on one side of the house. They sag right over a window well so in a heavy rain they spill over there with so much water they'll flood the well. There is a panel cut into the sheet rock now so if water comes in the house I can open up the wall to dry it. Luckily it's rare to get so much rain to flood it that bad but it did happen the other day.

Walls were painted with Kilz before we moved in but I thought I'd do it again after cleaning and then coat the floor. Is drylok pretty much the same or is it a little better?

Trying to figure out a good setup for a dehumidifyer. With no drain in the basement I know I won't remember to empty a bucket or something. Do you have any thoughts on a way to set that up?
 
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keep it clean

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Yes, I'm renting. It's a nice place and we're getting a good deal so I don't mind putting a little money into it for something like this.

We are working to get the gutters worked on on one side of the house. They sag right over a window well so in a heavy rain they spill over there with so much water they'll flood the well. There is a panel cut into the sheet rock now so if water comes in the house I can open up the wall to dry it. Luckily it's rare to get so much rain to flood it that bad but it did happen the other day.

Walls were painted with Kilz before we moved in but I thought I'd do it again after cleaning and then coat the floor. Is drylok pretty much the same or is it a little better?

Trying to figure out a good setup for a dehumidifyer. With no drain in the basement I know I won't remember to empty a bucket or something. Do you have any thoughts on a way to set that up?
I use a hvac pump on mine. Just cut a hose to drop into it. And run vinyl hose out a wall or window.

Drylok is more like paint with sand in it. Kinda pain to use but it works. As long as you dont have any efflorescence going on. If walls are smooth you can roll it using thick nap. But brushing it on gets better results.
 
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keep it clean

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Yes, I'm renting. It's a nice place and we're getting a good deal so I don't mind putting a little money into it for something like this.

We are working to get the gutters worked on on one side of the house. They sag right over a window well so in a heavy rain they spill over there with so much water they'll flood the well. There is a panel cut into the sheet rock now so if water comes in the house I can open up the wall to dry it. Luckily it's rare to get so much rain to flood it that bad but it did happen the other day.

Walls were painted with Kilz before we moved in but I thought I'd do it again after cleaning and then coat the floor. Is drylok pretty much the same or is it a little better?

Trying to figure out a good setup for a dehumidifyer. With no drain in the basement I know I won't remember to empty a bucket or something. Do you have any thoughts on a way to set that up?
If walls are already primed ide probably just go with a elastomeric paint. Can spray it or roll it. Much easier to use and its designed for masonry and stucco.
 
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Odin

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how many bodies are buried under the concrete floor might be some off-gassing going on
 
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Frank House

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I'm in NW Montana. After some heavy rain the other day the humidity hit 52% for a day. It's down to about 20% now. That's with just a box fan running down there. That air circulation seems to be helping a lot. I also have AC going but that's upstairs.
I would use a 70 Pint dehumidifier. It won't have to run all the time. I feel Like you would notice a big difference with that alone. I would set it at 40%.
 

Robert86

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We're looking at some dehumidifiers now. Still want to clean and seal it then run the dehu down there. Especially with the wet season coming up.
 
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