30amp? cord for airhog / old electrical in a lot of homes here

TillertheJohn

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2019
1,108
351
83
Real Name
John Cartegna
Business Location
United States
Okay guys I really appreciate everyones input around here. Very helpful. Lets see how this one turns out :)

I am running the air hog lx. And, since many of the homes are old here I am not convinced a lot of them have the electrical to run my air hog. I could be wrong but trying it in my own house and the first breaker popped right away.

So, I am wondering a couple things about getting and keeping longer extension cords to run to my generator in a pinch - as in if the logistics of a job require me to bring equipment in but have to get power back at the van from my generator.

The air hog has 2- 15 amp plugs coming out of it. Is it possible to get a 'Y' to connect to the 2 plugs and then 1 longer extension cord to go back to my generator, say, in the 30 amp plug socket or something? And, what kind of gauge might I need for say 50 feet and possibly 100'?

I hope this makes sense. And, I know the extension cords get expensive but might be worth it because I believe my vacs can perform very solid especially the closer they are to the job.

Thank you in advance.
 

Common janitor

Well-Known Member
Apr 5, 2014
3,435
2,601
113
66
Real Name
Ed Feil
Correct . Minimum of 12-2 at 50 feet . I’ve done 100 feet with them but honestly not that great of an idea . 10-2 cords at 100 feet would be a better choice . Pricey but worth it . One thing I did in the past running a generator for a radial arm saw in the boonies was make my own cord from Romex and it worked fine at what had to be 100 feet plus . You could use a short 10-2 multiple plug adapter too .
All the Best , Ed
 

CCWorks

Premium VIP
Jan 3, 2010
11,483
1,464
113
Michigan
Real Name
Greg
Business Location
United States
I seen some say the LX motors draw 15, or 16 and up to 17 amps per motor. I do not really know the amp draw.

But try to find 2, 20 amp sockets.

Cheap cords or over loaded cord will over heat and restrict the amps / volts to run your equipment as it needs. Starving electric to your motors will cause you problems.
 

TillertheJohn

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2019
1,108
351
83
Real Name
John Cartegna
Business Location
United States
Correct . Minimum of 12-2 at 50 feet . I’ve done 100 feet with them but honestly not that great of an idea . 10-2 cords at 100 feet would be a better choice . Pricey but worth it . One thing I did in the past running a generator for a radial arm saw in the boonies was make my own cord from Romex and it worked fine at what had to be 100 feet plus . You could use a short 10-2 multiple plug adapter too .
All the Best , Ed
Thank you.

What is a 10-2 cord? Is that another way of saying a 10 gauge extension cord?
 

CCWorks

Premium VIP
Jan 3, 2010
11,483
1,464
113
Michigan
Real Name
Greg
Business Location
United States
If a motor is started off at a bad current value, it starts operating in a much warmer condition than the design temperature. It is very important that the motors should be matched with their ideal current values.



How Motors Behave on "Low Voltage"

 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnny Bravo

Odin

Well-Known Member
Mar 26, 2014
2,183
1,714
113
Real Name
terje brevik
better carry a few of these

85426
 

CCWorks

Premium VIP
Jan 3, 2010
11,483
1,464
113
Michigan
Real Name
Greg
Business Location
United States
I was looking at extension cords last night and noticed the 10 - 2 and 10 - 3 cords seem to have the 10 gage wire but only have a 15 amp connector.

So I say to the guys that run 20 amps on one cord.

Be sure you have a 20 amp connector / plug connector on your 10-2 / 12-2 cord.
 

Johnny Bravo

Hacking my way though life, one room at a time.
Apr 25, 2011
24,188
8,737
113
San Pedro, Ca
TheJohnnyOnTheSpot.Com
Real Name
John Sheridan
Business Location
United States
Looks possibly like a fuse? Can you please tell me more. Im afraid sometimes I need things spelled out for me. At least Id rather it that way than me make the wrong assumptions on what is being communicated to me.
Thank you.


Yes, that is an older fuse. If you're really working in older houses they have fuses like the one in the picture. They overheat and pop and then have to be replaced like in a car. Those are the bad ones to work with because you have to replace them as opposed to the new houses that you just have to flip the breaker switch and you're back in business.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: Odin

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,895
4,379
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
Okay guys I really appreciate everyones input around here. Very helpful. Lets see how this one turns out :)

I am running the air hog lx. And, since many of the homes are old here I am not convinced a lot of them have the electrical to run my air hog. I could be wrong but trying it in my own house and the first breaker popped right away.

So, I am wondering a couple things about getting and keeping longer extension cords to run to my generator in a pinch - as in if the logistics of a job require me to bring equipment in but have to get power back at the van from my generator.

The air hog has 2- 15 amp plugs coming out of it. Is it possible to get a 'Y' to connect to the 2 plugs and then 1 longer extension cord to go back to my generator, say, in the 30 amp plug socket or something? And, what kind of gauge might I need for say 50 feet and possibly 100'?

I hope this makes sense. And, I know the extension cords get expensive but might be worth it because I believe my vacs can perform very solid especially the closer they are to the job.

Thank you in advance.
I wouldn't recommend trying to "Y" your cords - there's no guarantee that you're going to be in-phase and pulling equal amperage from both cords, and an imbalance in the system may cause damage down the road.

Plus, whenever one female is disengaged and the other is plugged in, you've got a live 30-amp kick-in-the-arse just waiting to happen... which is not something you typically get to laugh about afterward. I know you wouldn't be foolish enough to plug in the 30-amp end until both 15s are engaged... but if someone else on-site was, you'd potentially be liable for their death.

I'd say better safe than crispy on this one.
 

John LaBarbera

Preferred Vendor
Premium VIP
Sep 13, 2008
2,745
1,233
113
72
San Diego, Ca
www.mytee.com
Real Name
John LaBarbera
Okay guys I really appreciate everyones input around here. Very helpful. Lets see how this one turns out :)

I am running the air hog lx. And, since many of the homes are old here I am not convinced a lot of them have the electrical to run my air hog. I could be wrong but trying it in my own house and the first breaker popped right away.

So, I am wondering a couple things about getting and keeping longer extension cords to run to my generator in a pinch - as in if the logistics of a job require me to bring equipment in but have to get power back at the van from my generator.

The air hog has 2- 15 amp plugs coming out of it. Is it possible to get a 'Y' to connect to the 2 plugs and then 1 longer extension cord to go back to my generator, say, in the 30 amp plug socket or something? And, what kind of gauge might I need for say 50 feet and possibly 100'?

I hope this makes sense. And, I know the extension cords get expensive but might be worth it because I believe my vacs can perform very solid especially the closer they are to the job.

Thank you in advance.
Two 15 amp outlet should be easy to find. You can run one motor on a single cord. The should be dedicated circuit. Plugging into a 15 amp outlet that is also supporting other appliances will not work. At Mytee we also make a converter to take 230 volt dryer and turn it into dual 20 amp dedicated circuits.
 

Jimsteam

Premium VIP
Apr 19, 2009
7,733
2,978
113
NOYB
Real Name
Jim
Business Location
United States
Yes, that is an older fuse. If you're really working in older houses they have fuses like the one in the picture. They overheat and pop and then have to be replaced like in a car. Those are the bad ones to work with because you have to replace them as opposed to the new houses that you just have to flip the breaker switch and you're back in business.
Right here is why many jumped to a generator or a true TM.
Also as John pointed out "A dedicated Circuit" is what you should seek. Again not always the easiest to find.
I hated popping breakers or fuses actually quite embarrassing and yanking out these new 1K washer and dryers for 220v is risky at the least.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnny Bravo

J20770

Premium VIP
Jan 14, 2019
189
218
43
Real Name
Jason Dumont
The kitchen should(it is a code requirement) have three 20 amp circuits, one may be shared with the refrigerator. The washer should (it's also a code requirement) have its own 20 amp circuit. Outdoor outlets should also be on it's own circuit. Garages also have dedicated 20 amp circuits. Poke around under the sink, you may find the disposer or dishwasher plug into an outlet instead of being hard wired, they are supposed to be on dedicated circuits. Typically what you need is there, you just need to find it.
 

keep it clean

Premium VIP
Dec 3, 2012
13,083
7,620
113
Pa
Real Name
Nick
Business Location
United States
The kitchen should(it is a code requirement) have three 20 amp circuits, one may be shared with the refrigerator. The washer should (it's also a code requirement) have its own 20 amp circuit. Outdoor outlets should also be on it's own circuit. Garages also have dedicated 20 amp circuits. Poke around under the sink, you may find the disposer or dishwasher plug into an outlet instead of being hard wired, they are supposed to be on dedicated circuits. Typically what you need is there, you just need to find it.
Should... But that is new construction or rehab under permit. Everything else is homegrown or grandfathered in. So you will find most outside outlets to be hooked into the entire homes lighting circuit plus some. Same with kitchen. I have one in my house. The kitchen gfci is on same circuit as the lights all of them, the post light, the washing machine, toaster ,microwave... hate that freakin thing. Once i get a new 200a panel im rewiring this whole house.
 

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,895
4,379
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
Also be wary of older homes and the possibility of aluminum wiring - it will want to run hot, especially if you're maxing out your draw. No amount of Noalox in the world will make old aluminum perform to the same standards as copper. If you're in an older home with two-prong outlets and you're noticing the outlet getting warm, it's time to stop and re-evaluate before you start a fire.
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
4,387
5,319
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
Okay guys I really appreciate everyones input around here. Very helpful. Lets see how this one turns out :)

I am running the air hog lx. And, since many of the homes are old here I am not convinced a lot of them have the electrical to run my air hog. I could be wrong but trying it in my own house and the first breaker popped right away.

So, I am wondering a couple things about getting and keeping longer extension cords to run to my generator in a pinch - as in if the logistics of a job require me to bring equipment in but have to get power back at the van from my generator.

The air hog has 2- 15 amp plugs coming out of it. Is it possible to get a 'Y' to connect to the 2 plugs and then 1 longer extension cord to go back to my generator, say, in the 30 amp plug socket or something? And, what kind of gauge might I need for say 50 feet and possibly 100'?

I hope this makes sense. And, I know the extension cords get expensive but might be worth it because I believe my vacs can perform very solid especially the closer they are to the job.

Thank you in advance.

I had to read this again to understand what you want to do. Yes you can run one "cord" from the generator in the van and plug in the two airhog cords to this one cord. However and with reservations:

1) never ever make a "suicide cord" with male ends on each end
2) always load the generator head equally on both phases of power, lopsided loads are bad for generator lifespans
3) use the 240v outlet > 75-100' 10/4 cord > 240v to dual 120v female outlets on the job end for "only" the airhog (virtually balanced load)
4) if you are not sure about doing any of this pay someone to wire up the cords right.

Done right this will be an extremely handy and fast setup for you.
 

keep it clean

Premium VIP
Dec 3, 2012
13,083
7,620
113
Pa
Real Name
Nick
Business Location
United States
I had to read this again to understand what you want to do. Yes you can run one "cord" from the generator in the van and plug in the two airhog cords to this one cord. However and with reservations:

1) never ever make a "suicide cord" with male ends on each end
2) always load the generator head equally on both phases of power, lopsided loads are bad for generator lifespans
3) use the 240v outlet > 75-100' 10/4 cord > 240v to dual 120v female outlets on the job end for "only" the airhog (virtually balanced load)
4) if you are not sure about doing any of this pay someone to wire up the cords right.

Done right this will be an extremely handy and fast setup for you.
I thought about doing that long ago using 3 wire. But ide rather just replace cords. They get messed up and crimped in doors too often for me to keep making them.
Suicide cords lol i like that term. I see crap like that from time to time. Diy generator to house that is dangerously common. Job sites too. Always have to be aware of backfeed.
Good thing some of the cleaning folks never seen how harwood guys power their sanders. Dont want to give anyone any ideas.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jim Davisson