Electric inline heaters

Discussion in 'Portable Carpet Cleaning' started by Churchill, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. Churchill

    Churchill Member

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    I am looking to purchase an electric inline heater to my set up for those real dirty/greasy carpets that I run into that could use that extra heat. I use the rotovac 360i so I am on the water alot which i know will affect the heat. I am looking at the volcano 6000 as it can give an increase of 100 degrees in water temp instantly without letting off the water. My concern with this is tripping breakers with the heater, my portable, and rotovac. Its a lot of amps and I think it can be frustrating finding all separate circuits. Also, it can only be plugged into stove/dryer outlets from what I heard and this concerns me. I am also considering the mytee 2400 watt. I know that it wont heat the water as fast but I like how it has 4 switches and I think it will be more practical with the breakers. Just want to know some of your thoughts that use electric inline heaters and there experiences and recommendations. If there is a different model that you think would better fit my needs please feel free to tell me about it. Thanks Guys!
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  2. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    I did a quick calculation, and the quoted 100F rise (for the volcano 6000) appears to be done with an 02 flow jetting. If your 360i has stock jets (04.5) you would expect about half that.

    For the Mytee 2400, you can expect around 17-20 degrees rise (for continuous flow) for your 360i.
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  3. Blacktiedetailing

    Blacktiedetailing WWW.CRSTONECARE.COM www.crsurfacecare.com Premium VIP

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    I plan on buying a 360i real soon. But also plan on a 2HT heater or the diesel powered unit. Costly but as the saying goes, it takes $$$ to make $$$$.....
  4. Decker

    Decker Premium VIP

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    Hey Dan. Thanks for the above info. Concerning the RX20, which I assume will go thru hot water as fast as a 360, can I assume the same water flow and heater performance? (also using a Mytee Turbo Hot water heater, and stock jets which list as 80015)

    I will be using an RX20 with a speedster, curious if the heat will keep up. Plan to boost with Mytee Turbo heater when more heat is needed and power is available...

    Can you point me in the direction of some of the formulas you used to calculate heat gain? that would be spectacular!

    Mike
  5. Scott W

    Scott W Preferred Vendor Premium VIP

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    Available power and the flow rate of the water are the limiting factors of the heat rise from an electric heater. No matter what brand you can only get so much heat from X amount of electric power. So, it is good to have realistic expectations. Also consider how much current is available. Will most of your jobs have the 240 volt dryer plug available? If so, there is more electric power available and more heat available.

    The video demo of the Volcano 6000 which I saw on You Tube showed a 78 degree temp rise with the .02 jets. With the 360 i you would get about 35 degree temp rise under same conditions.

    Common figures for a 2000 watt heater are temp rise between 18 and 28 degrees depending upon the jet size and how much of the time the wand is open. At tool like the 360i if the water flowing most of the time and larger jets would only produce a temperature rise of less than 15 degrees.
  6. Churchill

    Churchill Member

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    So with a rotovac wand are these inline heaters basically a waste of time and money? Or can you still make them beneficial? I would think that if I do a wet pass and then a dry pass back and fourth it would allow the heater time to increase the water temp a significant amount no?
  7. Blacktiedetailing

    Blacktiedetailing WWW.CRSTONECARE.COM www.crsurfacecare.com Premium VIP

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    Church hill, I am in the same boat. I plan on using a 360i as well and EVERYONE tells me that an inline will not keep up. With a wand would be fine. I am looking at the 2HT propane for use with the rv360i. If the rug is not that nasty a wand will be fine with the inline heater. But $$$ for an inline and $$$ for the 2ht. Might just go with the 2HT.
  8. Churchill

    Churchill Member

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    How would you use the 2ht propane heater with the portable being in the house? doesn't that heater stay in the truck and is used for truck mounts that have water tanks? I am not familiar with the 2ht?
  9. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    Mike, I'm unfamiliar with the RX, but if the flow is the same the temp will be as well. If you really want to know about the math, I will share, but don't blame me if your eyes glaze over and you fall asleep... For those that don't like the techie stuff, look away now!

    The accepted conversion for watts to BTU is 1000Wh = 3412.3 BTU. I won't go into the conversion for this - not important here.

    So, the volcano's 6000W translates into 20,473 BTU. Run it for an hour and you get 20,473 BTUH (BTU's per hour).

    One BTU will raise one pound of water one degree (F). So, we need to convert our water flow into pounds. Oops, I guess we need to know our flow first. I published a real-world flow table in a previous thread, from that table I can see that an 045 flow (three 015 jets) at 250 psi (I just picked an average pressure) with a 100' hose will flow right around 1 gpm.

    1 gallon = 8.34 pounds, so our flow is 8.34 pounds per minute, or (X60) 500.4 pounds per hour.

    So, we have 20,473 BTUH to heat 500.4 pounds of water. 20,473/500.4 = 40.91.

    In a perfect world, you would see a rise of about 41 degrees, but this is not a perfect world! Because of wiring losses and efficiency less than 100%, your rise will be a little less. Scott W predicted 35 given the video he saw, this is in line with what I suggest as well. There is no way to accurately predict the losses given we don't know particulars about the volcano's construction.

    Substitute 2400 watts (Mytee) or any other wattage heater into the formula, then subtract 10 or 15 percent for losses, and you can calculate heat rise for any heater. If you can bucket test your wand or rotary to get accurate flow at your operating pressure, you can actually get pretty close!
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  10. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    Depends on what you view as significant. Once you stop flow, the water in the heater does get hotter, for sure. How much water? Maybe a quart or two? Then when you start the flow you will get a temp rise, but at a 1 gallon per minute flow it doesn't last long. If you time your wet/dry passes just right, you can see hotter temps, but the temp will vary - higher, then tapering off - higher, then... well you get the picture. Average temps will be higher, but how much depends on your technique, and the amount of time you spend on dry passes.
  11. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    I have my 2HT on a cart with a propane tank. I wheel it up to the house and run solution lines to/from the porty. For most jobs, my porty stays outside next to the heater. with 75' of vac hose, I can reach most all the places I do. If you do high rise work or places that have a locked door policy, a 2HT won't work.
  12. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    Not necessarily a waste. No, you will never get blazing truckmount temps with an electric heater, but ANY temp rise helps the chems work better. Even a 20 degree rise will make a difference. You will have to make up for the lower temps from the other pieces of the cleaning pie, Time (dwell), Agitation, Chems.
  13. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    This will be my last post tonight, promise...

    Just for grins, plug the little giant 2HT into our 360i example (the 2HT is rated 65,000 BTU):

    65,000 / 500.4 = 130 degrees

    130 - 10% (to be real) = 117 degree rise! Fossil fuels rule!

    G'nite everyone, my brain is fried.
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  14. Churchill

    Churchill Member

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    Thank you for all that info it helped me out a lot. I think I am going to consider the 2HT now.

  15. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    Good morning. After posting all that last night, it occured to me that I could do the opposite, and calculate the size of electric heater needed to equal the output of a 2HT.

    Turns out to get 65,000 BTU would require a 19,050 watt electric heater. That's 79 amps at 240 volts, or 158 amps at 120 volts! At my electric rate, it would cost $2.28 an hour to run. Wow.
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  16. Scott W

    Scott W Preferred Vendor Premium VIP

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    And the adapter to plug that 19K watt heater....? :)

    Thanks for the nice technical response, Dan. I love when people can discuss a topic with no mud slinging.
  17. CCWorks

    CCWorks Well-Known Member

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    A true educator, your a good person to help us under stand ever aspect of this situation.
  18. Churchill

    Churchill Member

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    Wow that is a lot of watts lol....I would love to get the 2ht but I am afraid it wont be pratical if I am doing a resturant or other commerical job if my portables are inside the building. Does anyone out there ever bring a propane heater inside? I am thinking about buying the new jaguar from cross american when its realeased which I was told can run 150 ft No problem. If I do that then I could use the 2ht with my electric truckmounted portable.
  19. dgardner

    dgardner New Member

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    Get both. use the LG when you can, and the 'lectric when you have to. The Mytee one is nice because you can tailor the watts to what you have available.

    I would not personally run a propane heater inside, unless it was a very large space (like a big box store, the type of place you would run a propane buffer), and I had written permission. Even then my liability insurer might have something to say about that...
  20. Jimsteam

    Jimsteam Well-Known Member

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    Some great posts sir !!
    I use the 2HT also but leave it in my trailer. Do you feed hot or cold tap water into your extractor? I have a fresh water tank but on the nastys or commercial always thought of feeding hot tap water via my AF. Preheated b4 entering LG.
    Do you use a 360 or similar with your 2ht? Realizing the RV is a high flow wondering how much this could affect the constant heat.
    In the cold -freezing temps an electric heater could be of use to help maintain temps and certainly with my smaller non-heated porty/booster/spotter.
    Thanks for all the great info.
    JIM

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